Richard Bennett
Menu Bio Discography Productions CD's Gallery Notes from Nashville Notes from the Road Press Links Join Mailing List Contact Home

Contrary Cocktail

Moderne Shellac, 2015

Contrary Cocktail

A hypnotic blend of rhythms, landscapes, tones, colors, styles and moods, with melodies leading the way to certain places that only songs without words can go.

-- Pieta Brown, 2015

ListenAbout ItOrderWrite In

It was an hour flight from Teterboro, New Jersey to Dulles Airport in Washington, D.C.,  On the way to the venue we passed the Lincoln Memorial and the White House.  

 

Tonight’s show was in the Warner Theatre.  It was built in 1924 as a movie and vaudeville house and originally called the Earle Theatre the later renamed in honour of Jack Warner of Warner Bros. renown.  

 

Mark Bartel, the fellow who makes Tone King Amplifiers met us with a brand new prototype amp that sounds like a million bucks.  He was pleased to see that there were three Tone Kings on stage tonight as every night.  Mark, John and I use Tone King Imperials and love them.  Also, there was a great picture in today’s New York Times as part of an article on performance artist Laurie Anderson in conjunction with an installation that includes a wall of Tone Kings that belonged to her husband and founding member of Velvet Underground, Lou Reed.  Check it out here: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/18/movies/laurie-anderson-is-telling-stories-hers-and-ours.html?emc=edit_th_20151018&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=65815463 

 

A relatively small theatre seating just 1,690, it had the feeling of a club gig, very intimate.  Another wonderful audience and another great show.  It’s really hit home now that we’re on the last few shows of this fantastic tour.  It hard to believe it all began last April, how far we’ve come and how much we’re still enjoying and refining the music.

 

A day off tomorrow that will be spent with Rudy Pensa at his brilliant guitar shop in Soho and visiting old friends from Nashville who are now relocated here in the city.

 

So long,

 

 

Richard